Krista Almanzan

News Director & All Things Considered Host

Krista joined KAZU in 2007.  She is an award winning journalist with more than a decade of broadcast experience.  Her stories have won regional Edward R. Murrow Awards and honors from the Northern California Radio and Television News Directors Association.  Prior to working at KAZU, Krista reported in Sacramento for Capital Public Radio and at television stations in Iowa.  Like KAZU listeners, Krista appreciates the in-depth, long form stories that are unique to public radio. She's pleased to continue that tradition in the Monterey Bay Area.

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Local
9:57 am
Fri September 12, 2014

From Surfers to Scientists: Ocean Health XPrize Competitors Begin Lab Trials

Benjamin Thompson founder of Boardformula shows his smart fin.
Credit Krista Almanzan

As CO2 emissions increase, so will ocean acidification.  The problem happens when the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the seawater’s pH level drops.  It’s already harming oyster hatcheries and coral reefs. 

A solution could begin with the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPrize, an international competition for the development of accurate and affordable pH sensors.   Lab trials for the prize are underway in Moss Landing at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).

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Local
4:05 pm
Thu September 4, 2014

Foster Youth Lead the Way in Opening New Center

The Epicenter's mission statement hangs in the entryway of the new center at 20 Maple Street in Salinas.
Credit Krista Almanzan

An 18th birthday can be a tricky time for kids in foster care.  As adults, they can leave the system, but being out their own isn’t easy.  Statistics from the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption show 1 in 5 foster kids will be homeless after 18 and only half will have a job at 24.  

But a growing number of California communities are finding a solution in a community center model where foster kids help other foster kids transition out of the system into adulthood.  One such center opens today in Salinas.  It’s called the Epicenter.

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Local
6:00 am
Tue August 26, 2014

Local Author Takes Readers Inside Salinas Gangs

Journalist and author Julia Reynolds and her new book.

Salinas has an estimated 3000 gang members.  Yet most the people who live there, work there or visit can carry on with their day unaffected by all that’s going on in the gang underworld.

But a new book titled Blood in the Fields: Ten Years Inside California’s Nuestra Familia Gang pulls back the curtain on one of the most violent gangs in America. 

It’s written by award winning journalist and Harvard Nieman Fellow Julia Reynolds (JR). She’s a reporter with the Monterey County Herald.

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Local
3:16 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Salinas Looked at as a Model for Efforts in Reducing Youth Violence

A delegation from Washington D.C. follows Salinas Police Officer and PAL Executive Director Angel Gonzalez on a tour of the future of the Police Activities League (PAL).
Credit Krista Almanzan

Salinas has had no shortage of violence lately with two deadly shootings just last week.  But this week the city is being looked at as a model for its efforts in reducing youth violence.   

A delegation visiting from Washington D.C. spent Tuesday and Wednesday going to meetings, presentations and tours like one in the refurbished National Guard armory across the street from the Salina’s Police Department.

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Local
11:09 am
Thu August 14, 2014

This Smart Machine is Leading the Way to the Future of Agriculture

Blue River Technology's LettuceBot thins a field in Salinas. Jorge Heraud follows the machine to monitor its decision making.
Credit Cindy Carpien, NPR

The Salinas Valley is getting a lot of attention from Silicon Valley lately.   A new tech incubator will soon open up in downtown Salinas hoping to grow the connection between agriculture and technology.

But even before that, one Silicon Valley start-up was already hard at work tweaking its version of a machine that thins lettuce plants.  It’s a job normally handled by human hands.  But this may be just the tip of the iceberg in a new era of smart machines in agriculture. 

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